Sharon Sayler

Member: Video Tips 11-20

Video Tip #11 – When Not To Make Eye Contact

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Many times, when a listener hears news that is painful, volatile or emotional they don't want anyone watching them have an emotional response. They try to hold it in or turn away. One way to give the listener the opportunity to have the emotional response is for you to glance down for a moment or two and gently nod. Looking away allows the speaker to have an emotional response and "save face". Nodding lets them know you are listening.  Make eye contact and connect, then look down and nod for a while. The break in eye contact is okay.  Even over the course of normal, positive conversation, eye contact is a series of long glances instead of intense stares.

Video Tip #12 – Gesture for Teamwork

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When we expect two diverse groups to play well together we want to have our hand gestures send that same message. While speaking of teamwork move both arms outward with open palms. As you mention Team 1 create a phantom location for them with an upward open palm, placing Team 1 in one hand and Team 2 in the other hand. As you finish your comments about teamwork bring your hands together in a gentle clasp. This relays the expectation of joining the two teams. You can place multiple items in each hand and join them together, as long as you remember what you place where and it makes sense to the audience.

Video Tip #13 – Are You Addicted to the Verbal Pause

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Eye contact is the easiest and most immediate nonverbal that people notice. It can be subtle or direct, and knowing how to mix the two is a major part of the art of building relationships. How much is too much or too little varies with the culture, gender, and context. Eye contact works best when both parties feel it is just right. Therefore, take your cues from the other person and match their preference for how much direct eye contact to use.

Video Tip #14 – #20 Coming Soon

 

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